Faux Finishes / Texturing

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Faux painting or Faux finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. The naming comes from the French word faux, meaning false, as these techinques started as a form of replicating materials such as marble and wood with paint, but has subsequently come to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture.

  • Marbleizing or faux marbling is used to make walls and furniture look like real marble. This can be done using either plaster or glaze techniques.
  • Graining, wood graining, or faux bois (French for “fake wood”) is often used to imitate exotic or hard-to-find wood varieties.
  • Trompe l’oeil, “trick the eye” in French, is a realistic painting technique often used in murals, and to create architectural details.
  • Venetian plaster is a smooth and often shiny plaster design that appears textured but is smooth to the touch. Venetian plaster is one of the most popular and traditional plaster decorations.
  • Color wash is a free-form finish that creates subtle variations of color using multiple hues of glaze blended together with a paint brush.
  • Strie, from the French word meaning “stripe” or “streak”, is a glazing technique that creates soft thin streaks of color using a paint brush. It is a technique often used to simulate fabrics such as linen and denim.
  • Rag painting or ragging is a glazing technique using twisted or bunched up rags to create a textural pattern.